BAZ-ART features Linus Haertjens

in Featured Artistin IPAF 2018

LINUS HAERTJENS

http://linushaertjens.tumblr.com

The Brussels based artist, grew up in Mozambique around his art enthusiast parents who exposed him to all the finest works from all around the world. Linus soon developed a keen interest for art and storytelling and later pursued both communication sciences and fine art.

Linus, Spear, Page33, Zesta. Swift Road, Salt River, South Africa. IPAF February 2018

His style brilliantly features his journalistic core with layers of story often unfolding as one experiences his work. He has a unique ability to maintain multifaceted stories, revealing all sides through his work and yet allowing for an open ended closure. Just as aging walls reveal different layers of paint as they disintegrate; his paintings aspire to depict a fading and multi-layered memory. Often inspired by locals of a given context and by the textures and colours of decaying paint, he finds poetry in reminiscence, albeit fictional.

Linus, Spear, Page33, Zesta. Swift Road, Salt River, South Africa. IPAF February 2018

He often spends an extended period of time first absorbing the environment as to get a better sense of his surroundings, in order to tell an honest thought provoking tale through his painting. He strongly believes that “Every story deserves to be told” and has set out to do just that through public art. He uses the public art arena as a medium to exercise his journalism as he finds communities are less reluctant to share with an artist than with a reporter.

He humbly gives due to being merely the hand of every piece he produces. He believes the soul is in the expression of a dialogue and in the lives of the stories he conveys. To him every piece is co-created with the subject.

Linus, Spear, Page33, Zesta. Swift Road, Salt River, South Africa. IPAF February 2018

For the International Public Art Festival he collaborated on a 80m long masterpiece with Spear, Page33 and Zesta. The quartet, all from very different backgrounds came together in perfect harmony producing one of the most conversational murals for this year’s festival. Their attention to composition indeed paid off and can be observed through their witty yet relatable showpiece.

Their piece on Swift Road, pays reference to the Cape minstrels of the Salt River community, the graffiti art by laws of Cape Town and the dire water situation Capetonians find themselves in.

 

 

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